Social justice in the prophet Amos and today
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Social justice in the prophet Amos and today pars dissertationis ad lauream in facultate s. theologiae apud Pontificiam universitatem s. Thomae in urbe by Leo Efiong Etim

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Published by Pontificia studiorum universitas a s. Thoma Aq. in Urbe in Roma .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Bible. -- O.T. -- Amos -- Criticism, interpretation, etc.,
  • Social justice -- Biblical teaching.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementLeo Efiong Etim.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsBS1585.52 .E85 2002
The Physical Object
Paginationx, 182 p. ;
Number of Pages182
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18485383M

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Amos shows God demanding justice from them rather than worship: “I hate, I despise your festivals But let justice roll down like waters, and righteousness like a mighty stream” (Amos ). Other prophets, working in the sister kingdom of Judah, are indignant about similar things.   Since justice and righteousness are the focus of Amos’ message, it is important to look at how the words justice and righteousness are used by the prophet. The words justice and righteousness are used together three times in two chapters of the book of Amos (Amos ; ; ). The word justice is used once by itself (Amos ). Social Justice in the Book of Amos Assignment When Israel expanded its borders, it basically took a monopoly on the most popular trade route in the region, he Kings Highway. And like any identity with a monopoly, they took advantage of it, and added fees to the route. Toward a Theology of Social Justice in the Book of Amos.

Arguably, the Book of Amos is exclusively about morality and social justice. Despite the fact that Israel certainly had problems with idolatry in his time, Amos never explicitly condemns it—nor any other sin pertaining to Israel’s direct service of God.   The biblical books bearing their names suggest that Amos, Isaiah, and Micah talked a lot about economic and social justice, often announcing judgment on current injustice. Amos, Isaiah and Micah spoke into a grave geopolitical situation in eighth-century Israel. Social injustice is the point at which Amos speaks most devastatingly to the present age. Although cloaked in modern dress, many of the fundamental demands of God expressed by Amos are still violated today. Today, they are known as the Ten Lost Tribes of Israel. Amos is not a happy book to read. It does not contain the encouraging, soaring and hope-inspiring prophecies of Isaiah. No, Amos speaks of almost unending gloom and doom. This presents an interesting contrast when seen against Israel's surging power, wealth and influence.

Amos’ great innovation on the biblical landscape is that Israel’s moral state directly affects its national destiny. Arguably, the Book of Amos is exclusively about morality and social justice. Despite the fact that Israel certainly had problems with idolatry in his time, Amos never explicitly.   Although the Book of Amos, a book of the Jewish Scriptures, was written thousands of years ago (ca. B.C.E.), the words of the Jewish prophet, “the prophet of social justice,” apply to any government in which its officials or leaders live lavishly, while ignoring their own people as they struggle economically, living in is deeply concerned about a nation’s callous. From Amos onwards, we see prophets emerging who not only spoke into specific situations, but also wrote prophetically about the wider social order. Implicit in Israel's mono-theism was the belief that God was Lord of all the nations of the world, but Amos brought out the fuller implications of that truth.   Friends, what God is saying here through His prophet Amos is you cannot enact justice unless it's connected to obedience in following God. Everyone who talks about doing justice, bringing justice, being a people of justice are just talking a good talk because see, true changing justice can only happen when it's in accordance with obedience to.